Saturday, May 2, 2015

"The Bren is One Awesome Machine Gun."

Ya gotta love this World War II Canadian gun porn.
“Ronnie the Bren Girl”

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

I was never in the military and never in a shootout, but even with that lack of experience I could never understand the usefulness of a 500rd. per min. rate of fire and fed with a 30 rd. mag. I guess for it's day it was OK, like the BAR, but today unless you can fix a 100 rd. drum to it, it seems like a bit of a hindrance more than a help..Unless i'm missing something here.

GaryM said...

Two words, Trigger Control!

Merle Morrison said...

Don't forget the light weight & portability. It also was a product of it's time & military practices.

Merle

Anonymous said...

Cool pic, thanks, Mike.
That's it exactly, GaryM.
500 rpm is the MAX rate...
It's a highly portable squad automatic weapon(3man) that used the same .303R that the troops used in their (boltie) SMLE's. 30 caliber power, long heavy barrel = control and placement beyond standard infantry semi's. Sustained auto fire if necessary. Bursts intended as sustained fire could not be held due to heat/bbl change and ammo usage. Shooter, mag/bbl changer, ammo bearer/spotter.

Pretty simple. Firepower wins the day.

Anonymous said...

Anon @5:42AM - although your question has been (more or less) answered, look up: suppressive fire and fire and maneuver. I think that will give you a much better idea of why the Bren was so effective.

Anonymous said...

Once she left Inglis after the war, she worked as a model, married the trombone player George Guerrette and had seven children.. Both stayed in the music industry for some time before retiring. Veronica Foster (Guerrette) died in 2000.

III