Monday, October 1, 2012

Vertical integration of all law enforcement under the federal command. "The integration of firearms trace data into the fusion centers results in even closer collaboration among federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement."

An attorney forwarded me a copy of the latest Police Chief magazine which included an article by Ross Arends, ATF Supervisory Special Agent and a Fellow at the notoriously anti-gun International Association of Chiefs of Police: "The ATF’s iTrafficking Program: Linking Firearms Trace Data with State Fusion Centers." It was, the "single scariest proposal" he'd read recently.
The International Association of Chiefs of Police and the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF) have joined forces on a grant from the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA), U.S. Department of Justice, to study the impact of a collaborative project among the ATF, fusion centers, and local law enforcement to analyze firearms trace data along the northeast corridor of Interstate 95. This article highlights the work that carries forward the ATF’s commitment to improving the collection, the analysis, and use of firearms trace data in investigations.
Mind you, the eTrace system upon which this proposal is based is shot full of chaos and inefficiencies -- multiple traces, administrative traces having nothing to do with crime, etc -- and this proposal would provide trace information to people and organizations who, according to one of sources, "have no business in the law to it." And Arends understands the legal mienfield he is proposing to defeat by evasion:
While the ATF’s policy of not sharing one agency’s trace data with another agency does exist, there are still ways in which multiple agencies can work together using trace data.
Arends concludes:
BJA Grant to the IACP: Examine the iTrafficking Program
In December 2010, the BJA awarded a $250,000 grant to IACP to research and examine iTrafficking to determine ways in which gun trace data could more effectively be included in fusion center intelligence reports and business practice. To date, the project has accomplished the following:
* An advisory group was selected in concert with the IACP Firearms Committee to guide project development and implementation.
* A fusion center survey instrument was circulated to assess the state of practice on crime gun tracing policies.
* The project team is consolidating information from site visits to complete a promising practices document by fusion centers currently collecting crime gun tracing data.
* The project team continues to search for any statutory issues and barriers to impede implementation of a crime gun tracing intelligence sharing strategy.
* A mobile app was designed and distributed by the project team
using the ATF’s Police Officers Guide to Recovered Firearms. Since its launch in January, more than 21,000 downloads have been counted. This app is part of the project’s push to improve firearms tracing.
IACP staff is examining the results of the fusion center interviews and will assess the fusion center surveys once all are received. Finally, IACP staff will prepare and disseminate a firearms tracing intelligence-sharing strategy report that summarizes the review and the evaluation of iTrafficking. This review ideally will be used by fusion center personnel and all state, local, and tribal law enforcement to assist in the examination of firearms trace data used in intelligence products and criminal investigations.
The integration of firearms trace data into the fusion centers results in even closer collaboration among federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement. As fusion centers evolve into all-crime and all-hazards intelligence centers, a focus on firearms tracing and firearms trafficking enhances the collaborative environment. (Emphasis supplied, MBV.) The IACP is looking forward to sharing best practices, educational material, and other information that results from this initiative.
"The integration of firearms trace data into the fusion centers results in even closer collaboration among federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement. As fusion centers evolve into all-crime and all-hazards intelligence centers, a focus on firearms tracing and firearms trafficking enhances the collaborative environment."
That is what this is all about, in addition to sharing eTrace data with people who have no legal right to it -- the vertical integration of all law enforcement with the Feds at the top of the food chain, able to spy on local law enforcement, use them as cat's paws in investigations and escape all blowback if the operation goes south.

3 comments:

Taylor Harbin said...

I think the front cover is an interesting side note.

SWIFT said...

Very informative on the continuing merger of all Fed, State,Local and tribal police agencies. All of which is to the benefit of the Feds. My use of the term "merger" is incorrect, as the State, Locals and tribal police agencies will find out WTSHTF. They will be used as cannon fodder for gun confiscation raids and attempting to maintain continuity of government. By dangling little plumbs (including equipment)in front of these agencies, they are recruited like a politician taking bribes. Dealing with the Feds is the same as dealing with a Mafia loan shark; there is always a high price to pay. Soon, me thinks.

Ed said...

Time for Congress to disband and suspend funds for certain Federal agencies that would infringe on the freedoms of the citizens of United States of America.

Now, which one of those cowards will propose that, regardless of who wins the November election?

I want a lot for $174K per year plus benefits, don't I?

http://library.clerk.house.gov/reference-files/112_20120104_Salary.pdf